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International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP)

 

The International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP) is an Arctic Science Conference, convened periodically by IASC and its partners to identify key scientific questions and issues:

  • ICARP I, held in Hanover NH (USA) 1995, reviewed the state of Arctic science and resulted in a series of IASC-supported research projects;
  • ICARP II, held in Copenhagen (Denmark) 2005, developed twelve forward-looking science plans and resulted in several follow-up international projects and programs, mostly within the framework of the International Polar Year 2007-2008.
  • ICARP III, held in Toyama (Japan) 2015, provided a framework to further the development of cross-cutting, interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary initiatives for advancing Arctic research cooperation and applications of Arctic knowledge. The IASC Strategic Plan (2018-2023) builds on the key priorities and overarching messages of ICARP III.
  • ICARP IV will be held in Boulder, CO (USA) in 2025. More information will be available starting June 2022. 

 

In lead up to its 35th anniversary in 2025, the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) is coordinating a multi-year planning process for the Fourth International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP IV) that will engage Arctic researchers, policy makers, residents and stakeholders from around the world to collegially discuss the state of Arctic science, the place the Arctic occupies in global affairs and systems, to consider the most urgent knowledge gaps and research priorities that lie before us and to explore avenues to address these research needs.

The first ICARP was convened in Hanover New Hampshire, USA in 1995, implementing the IASC Founding Articles’ call for IASC to host such a conference periodically in order to “review the status of Arctic science, provide scientific and technical advice, and promote cooperation and links with other national and international organizations.” Since then, it has been the role of IASC to coordinate this important meeting every decade. ICARP II was held in Copenhagen in 2005 and developed twelve forward-looking science plans and resulted in several follow-up international projects and programs, mostly within the framework of the International Polar Year 2007-2008. ICARP III was in Toyama Japan in 2015 and provided a framework to further the development of cross-cutting, interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary initiatives for advancing Arctic research cooperation and applications for Arctic knowledge. The IASC Strategic Plan (2018 – 2023) builds on the key priorities and overarching messages of ICARP III.

For ICARP IV, a process initiating in 2022 will culminate at the ICARP conference to be convened in Boulder Colorado, USA in 2025, hosted by a consortium of US institutions, including the University of Colorado Boulder, University of Northern Iowa, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Alaska Pacific University. ICARP I, II, and III focused the attention of the world’s researchers toward the value of strategic international coordination in accelerating progress in addressing critical challenges. ICARP IV will build upon this concept by striving to achieve consensus and build collaborations among the leading scientific, academic, environmental, Indigenous and political organizations currently concerned with Arctic issues.

The ICARP IV process during 2022 to 2025 must be well planned and coordinated with other ongoing international activities. ICARP IV will identify important research questions and priorities that cut across disciplines and knowledge systems, and that require new and innovative thinking and collaboration. ICARP IV will develop a vision for implementation and science plans for addressing these priorities. An integral aspect of the ICARP IV will be the inclusion of early career scientists, Indigenous Peoples, and local residents in the development of priorities and science plans to address the key questions.

More information on ICARP IV and will be available starting end of June 2022.

 

icarp3 logoThe third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III) provided a framework to:

  • identify Arctic science priorities for the next decade;
  • coordinate various Arctic research agendas;
  • inform policy makers, people who live in or near the Arctic and the global community and
  • build constructive relationships between producers and users of knowledge.
  • ICARP III does not undertake the development of new science plans but rather builds on the many comprehensive science plans that exist already and compliments those with processes to identify gaps that may need attention.

Considering the outcomes of ICARP II, the International Polar Year, recent assessments and upcoming and new initiatives, it was a process for:

  • integrating priorities for forward-looking, collaborative, interdisciplinary Arctic research and observing and
  • establishing an inventory of recent and current synthesis documents and major developments in Arctic research.

Engaging all partners, including funders, in shaping the future of Arctic research needs, ICARP III:

  • produced a consensus statement identifying the most important Arctic research needs for the next decade;
  • provided a roadmap for research priorities and partnerships and
  • identified the potential and specific contributions of Arctic research partners to the International Polar Partnership Initiative

ICARP III was governed by a Steering Committee established by the participating organizations. It was structured along scientific themes and includes a series of events, culminating in a final conference at the Arctic Science Summit Week 2015.

More information on ICARP III is available here: https://icarp.iasc.info/icarp

The Second International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP II) was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 10-12 November 2005. It brought together scientists, policy makers, research managers, indigenous peoples, and others interested in and concerned about the future of Arctic research.

ICARP II was structured around twelve major areas of potential research needs, each of which has been led by an international team of scientists and other experts (e.g., elders and other leaders in the Indigenous communities of the North).

This process led to the analyses and recommendations, the results of which are documented in eleven Science Plans and a Background Paper on Contaminants.

More information on ICARP II is available here: https://icarp.iasc.info/icarp-ii

In the early 1990s, as IASC became fully operational, three developments converged to highlight the value of planning for the conduct of Arctic science. First, the end of the cold war and the emergence of a spirit of regional cooperation in the Arctic (reflected in the launching of the AEPS as well as the establishment of IASC itself) opened up the prospect of substantive cooperation between western and Russian scientists interested in the circumpolar north. Second, the onset of the era of ‘big science’ with research projects involving collaboration among larger groups of scientists and research institutes placed a premium on the development of effective coordination mechanisms. And third, the realization that the Arctic is a dynamic region subject to rapid and often non-linear changes in both biophysical and socioeconomic terms provided new impetus for conducting coordinated observations in an effort to understand the behavior of Arctic systems. 

IASC took the initiative early on to address this need, beginning with an effort on the part of the Executive Committee to develop a Science Agenda for the organization and moving forward at the 1994 annual meeting to approve an initial agenda focusing on four broad themes: (1) impacts of global change on the Arctic region and its peoples; (2) Arctic processes of relevance to global systems; (3) natural processes within the Arctic; and, (4) sustainable development in the Arctic. This meeting also generated the idea that it would be useful to convene a larger international planning conference to provide a roadmap for all those engaging in or desiring to engage in research on Arctic topics that would contribute to common themes and produce more robust findings. The US NSF, with proactive leadership on the part of Bob Corell and Pat Webber, rose to the occasion and provided generous finan02IASC Initiatives00cial backing for this initiative. Thus was born the idea of organizing the first International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP) at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA from 5 to 9 December 1995.

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